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How many Jewish sects are there?

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@ymuhammadc asked: Is it true there are only two Jewish sects or are there 71?

asked October 21, 2012

3 Answers

0
accepted

This question originates from the following ahadith that count how many Jewish, Christian and Muslim sects the are.

Sayyidina Rasulallah said: 
The Jews split into 71 groups; 1 group will enter Paradise and 70 will enter Hell. The Christians split into 72 groups; 1 group will enter Paradise and 71 will enter Hell. By Him in Whose Power is the life of Muhammad , without doubt, my Ummah will be divided into 73 groups. Only one will enter Paradise and 72 will enter Hell.

– Ibne Majah: Kitab al-Fitan, Hafiz Ibn Kathir: Signs before Day of Judgement, page 14

Sayyidina Rasulallah said:
There was disagreement amongst Jews and they split into 72 groups. In exactly the same way,there will be disagreement and divisions in my Ummah. It will split into 73 groups. Except for one of these groups, all the remaining will be thrown into Hell.

– Tirmidhi, Imam Ahmad, Abu Dawud, Mishkat

AbuHurayrah said:
The Prophet (SAW) said: The Jews were split up into seventy-one or seventy-two sects; and the Christians were split up into seventy one or seventy-two sects; and my community will be split up into seventy-three sects.

–  Sunan Abi Dawud 4596

Before we can verify how many Jewish sects there are we must first determine what a Jewish sect is within in the context of these ahadith. 

1. The sect cannot follow Jesus, for that would make it Christian
2. The sect cannot follow Muhammad (SAW), for that would make it Muslim
3. The sect must revolve around the Torah
4. The sect must have been founded by Banu Yisrael
5. The sect must worship the G-d of Ibrahim (AS), Ishaq (AS) and Yakub (AS) alone.

Now that we have established what a Jewish sect is we must determine when they came into existence. The tense Muhammad (SAW) uses suggests that he was referring to a historical event, “there was a disagreement and the Jews split”, so to identify these 71 or 72 sects we must first turn to the past.

First Century Sects

The Torah records the first Jewish sect as being the cult of the golden calf, the second sect we know of was the short lived sect of Korach, Datan and Aviram.  Later on, following the rule of Solomon, Yerav’am (Jeroboam) ben Nevat, established a sect in the Northern Kingdom of Israel. Although these examples are proof of sectarianism from Judaism’s earliest moments, the most fertile period for pre-diaspora Jewish sects was during the time of the Second Beit HaMikdash (Temple). Should there be ancient evidence for these ahadith, it is likely we’ll find it in this era. 

Sect Description Status
Pharisees / Perushim The Pharisees are the spiritual fathers of modern Judaism, emphasizing a strict interpretation and observance of the Mosaic law in both its oral and written form. Active
Sadducees / Tzedukim The Sadducees were a priestly, aristocratic sect that accepted Torah but rejected the oral law. Extinct
Essenes The Essenes lived in highly organized societies dedicated to asceticism, voluntary poverty, daily immersion, and abstinence from worldly pleasures, including (for some groups) celibacy.  Extinct
Zealots / Kanna’im / Biryonim They were a nationalist sect known for zealously defending Jewish law and national life, though they themselves were without religious leadership. Extinct
Sicarii A Kanna’im splinter group that hid daggers beneath their cloaks, which they used to stab anyone found committing a sacrilegious act or provoking anti-Jewish feeling (their name means “dagger”). Recorded by in the Talmud and by Josephus. Extinct
Therapeutae A Hellenistic Jewish sect with a reputation for philosophy, they lived chastely and in utter simplicity. Recorded by Philo. Extinct
Qumran Sect Were most likely an Essene sect that adopted a strict and separatist way of life. Most of what we know about them comes from their library preserved at Qumran (the Dead Sea Scrolls). Extinct
Galileans A small sect that believed Theudas to be a prophet of G-d. Recorded by Josephus and Justin Martyr Extinct
Herodians / Boethusians A Sadducean splinter sect recorded in the Talmud. Extinct
Hemerobaptists / Tovelei Shacharit They were an Essene sect that bathed each day before prayer in order to pronounce the name of G-d with a clean body. Recorded in the Talmud, Epiphanius and Hegesippus. Extinct
Followers of the Egyptian prophet Josephus mentions an Egyptian prophet proclaimed himself the Jewish messiah and led an army of 30,000 Jews to Jerusalem where they were quickly defeated. Extinct
Gnostics The gnostics were a first century Jewish sects that fused Gnosticism with Judaism. Extinct
Meristae An unidentified first century sect possibly Jewish recorded by Justin Martyr Extinct
Genistae An unidentified first century sect possibly Jewish recorded by Justin Martyr Extinct
Samaritans Although they rejected the Oral Law and the Written Law, in favor of their own slightly modified Torah, we have included the Samaritans as a Jewish sect because of their Jewish origin and closeness to Judaism Active

Chroniclers of this era talk of many more sects than those mentioned above, but if there were 71 or 72 sects during this period their names, beliefs and adherents have been lost to the passage of time. As only two sects from this era survived, instead of the 71 or 72 quoted in the ahadith Muhammad (SAW) could not have been talking about this period.

Sects at the time of Muhammad

The Prophet (SAW) spoke as if the split that had already happened, so the 71 or 72 sects should have been in existence during his lifetime. But when we examine 7th century Jewish theology we don’t see any such division, in fact we find the opposite. During this era the Talmudic schools of Babylon were able to unify the Jewish people into one homogeneous group. 

Sect Description Status
Pharisees / Jews Four centuries before the birth of Muhammad (SAW), rabbi Yehuda HaNasi realized the Oral Law was at risk of being forgotten and together with the greatest scholars of his time wrote it down in the Mishnah. The Mishnah was written in Israel, which during this period was the center of the Jewish world, but gradually rabbinic authority shifted from Israel to Babylon. 

For three centuries Babylonian rabbis elucidated the Mishnah in a collection of writings known as the Babylonian Gemara, together these teachings are known as the Babylonian Talmud.

About a century before the Babylonian Talmud was completed the rabbis of Israel finished the Jerusalem Talmud, which had similar teachings to its Babylonian counterpart but with greater focus on the laws relating to the land of Israel.

According to Maimonides during the time of the Geonim all Jewish communities formally accepted the Babylonian Talmud as binding upon themselves. However, there were isolated communities that Geonim weren’t in contact who with were unaware of this ruling. This explains why a small number of Jews to this day exclusively study the Jerusalem Talmud (e.g. the Romaniotes).

We must stress how similar in theology these two schools are, and for this reason we have not included them as separate sects. The rabbis of the Jerusalem Talmud are quoted throughout the Babylonian Talmud, and excluding one or two tiny communities – the Jerusalem and Babylonian Talmuds are universally learnt by all Jews today. Although the Babylonian Talmud takes precedence wherever the two conflict.

Active
Samaritans The Samaritans were still a large sect at the time of Muhammad (SAW) Active

It is highly unlikely that the Prophet was speaking about a division that occurred during his lifetime as this period was arguably the most unified the Jewish people had been since the 12 tribes wandered through the desert. The first known sect to emerge in the diaspora formed approximately 100 years after the death of  the Prophet (SAW), it is implausible that he was referring to any schism he witnessed.

Today’s divisions

Up until the haskala (the Jewish enlightenment) every Jew agreed to the divinity of the Written and Oral Law (with the exception of fringe groups like the Karaites and Samaritans). This meant that rather than dividing along theological lines, the Jewish communities differentiated themselves through the minhagim (customs) and nusachim (liturgy) that evolved in particular geographical areas. 

Although distinct from each other these groups are not sects, they share the same creed and any distinctions are slight and nuanced.

Sephardim
For 1500 years the Jewish communities of Sefard (the Iberian Peninsula) thrived until they were expelled from Christendom in 1492. Upon becoming homeless they sought refuge in friendlier nations, often with existing Jewish communities. These immigrant Jews brought with them a rich religious culture that was quickly adopted by the Pre-existing Jewish communities who were often far less scholarly. Today there is barely a community in the East that doesn’t follow the Shulchan Aruch or Mishneh Torah (two codifications of Jewish law written by Sephardi rabbis).

Ashkenazim
During the 11th century the Jews of France/Germany (Ashkenaz) began codifying customs and liturgy that slightly differed from their sephardi brethren, within a few centuries this community had swelled and developed into a rich civilization with it’s own language (Yiddish) and distinct religious characteristics. By the 17th century Poland-Lithuania had become the centers of this new world, where yeshivas and hasidic dynasties flourished. Today it is the biggest branch of Judaism with large settlements all over the world.

Mizrachim
Mizrach is Hebrew for east and is a collective term to describe the Jews that lived in the Middle East and Caucasus. While there are many Mizrachi groups, some with unique traditions that date back to the First Temple, most Mizrachim now follow a liturgy that combines their original traditions with the mainstream Sephardi customs.

Group Branch Sub-Group
Ashkenazim Because of their young age Ashkenazim are ethnically homogeneous
Beta Israel
Berber Jews
Georgian Jews
Italian Rite
Juhuro
Mizrahim Afghan Jews
Baghdadi Jews
Bene Israel
Cochin Jews
Bukhari Jews
Persian Jews
Syrian Jews
Romaniotes
Sephardim Maghrebi / Haketia Branch Algerian
Moroccan
Libyan
Tunisian
Judezmo Branch Greek
Turkish
Spanish & Portugese
Urfalim
Yemenite Baladi
Shami
Dor Daim

We have not included the Abayudaya, Bantu, Bnei Menashe, Black Hebrews, Igbo, Lemba and Yoruba as their claims have not been properly authenticated. Similarly we have excluded groups that lack notable religious distinctions.

Today’s sects

The last three centuries have seen an explosion in Jewish sectarianism, possibly greater than the time of the Second Temple. We have tried to list many of the divisions, but the line between sect and community is often blurred. 

We must also encourage caution when counting the Hasidic groups, most of these dynasties share near identical theologies and have only been included because of the distinct role each rebbe plays.

Movement Branch Sub-group
Orthodox / Pharisees Haredi Hasidic Achuza
Aleksander
Alesk
Amshinov
Apt/Zinkov/Mezhbizh
Ashlag
Bania
Beitsh
Belz
Berditchev
Bergsass
Biala
Bikovsk
Bitschkov
Bobov
Bohush
Borsha
Boston
Boyan
Bradshin
Breslov
Brezan
Brizdovitz
Burshtin
Chabad Lubavitch
Chernobyl
Chortkov
Chust
Chust-Tosh
Cleveland
Debrecen
Dinov
Dombrov
Dorog
Dushinsky
Dzhikov
Dzhikov-Melitzer
Erlau
Ger
Grusvardein
Hermanshtat
Hornsteipl
Husiatyn
Kalish
Kaliv
Karlin
Kasho
Kechneya
Kerestir
Khodorov
Koidanov
Kolbasov
Komarno
Kopyczynitz
Kosov
Kozhnitz
Kretshnif
Krula
Kuzmir
Lapash
Lelov
Lentshner
Lishensk
Liske
Lutsk
Machnovka
Magrov
Malachim
Melitz
Melitz-Turner
Mezhbizh
Mishkoltz
Modzitz
Mosholu
Munkacz
Muzhai
Nadvorna
Narol
Nikolsburg
Nirdhas
Novominsk
Ostrover
Ozharov
Pest
Pilzno
Pinsk-Karlin
Pittsburg
Polyina
Premishlan
Prochnik
Prshiskhe
Pshevosk
Puppa
Rachmastrivka
Rachov
Radomsk
Radovitz
Radzin
Ratzferter
Reisha
Rimenov
Roman
Ropshitz
Ruzhin
Sadigura
Sans-Tshakov
Sanz
Sanz-Gorlitz
Sanz-Gribov
Sanz-Klausenburg
Sanz-Leipnik
Sanz-Zhmigrod
Sasregen
Sassov
Satmar
Savran
Seilish
Shendishov
Shidlovtz
Shomer Emunim
Shotz
Shotz-Melitz
Siget
Sighet
Skolye
Skulen
Skver
Slonim
Slotvina-Sighet
Sochatchov
Spinka
Stanislov
Stitshin
Strizhov
Stropkov
Strozhnitz
Sulitz
Temeshvarer-Biksader
Toldos Aharon
Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok
Tosh
Trisk
Tsheshanov
Ulem
Ungvar
Vardein
Vasloi
Vien
Vizhnitz
Zablitov
Zalon-Lantzut
Ziditshiov-Drubitsh
Ziditshov
Zlotshov
Zolynia
Zolynia-Lantzut
Zutshka
Zvhil
Lithuanian Yeshivish
Perushim
Sephardi
Rambamists
Central Orthodox
Modern Orthodox Modern Orthodox
Open Orthodox
Carlebach
Religious Zionists Dati Leumi
Chardal
Maskilim Reform Reform / Liberal
Conservative / Masorti
Humanistic
Jewish Renewal.
Neolog
Reconstructionist
Humanistic
Karaites
Samaritans

Just like previous eras the ahadith seem unrelated to our current reality and any attempt to segment these 175 groups into 71 or 72 sects would be forced. In addition to not being able to reconcile the ahadith with Jewish sectarianism, the also mention divisions amongst the Chrstians and Muslims, yet the Protestant branch of Christianity has over 1,500 divisions alone and Islam also has far more than 73 divisions.

How are we to reconcile Jewish sectarianism with these ahadith? Both Judaism and Islam teach of yawm al-din (yom ha-din), the day when every man will be judged by Allah (SWT). At this time each man from every generation will be judged, members of extinct and active sects alike will be accountable on this day.

This means that while your initial question provoked a very interesting voyage through Jewish history. We do not need to seek evidence to support the ahadith in the modernity, we need only ask have there been 71 or 72 Jewish sects since the time of Musa (AS)? And this is entirely plausible

Allah (SWT) knows best.

0

This question originates from the following ahadith that count how many Jewish, Christian and Muslim sects the are.

Sayyidina Rasulallah said: 
The Jews split into 71 groups; 1 group will enter Paradise and 70 will enter Hell. The Christians split into 72 groups; 1 group will enter Paradise and 71 will enter Hell. By Him in Whose Power is the life of Muhammad , without doubt, my Ummah will be divided into 73 groups. Only one will enter Paradise and 72 will enter Hell.

– Ibne Majah: Kitab al-Fitan, Hafiz Ibn Kathir: Signs before Day of Judgement, page 14

Sayyidina Rasulallah said:
There was disagreement amongst Jews and they split into 72 groups. In exactly the same way,there will be disagreement and divisions in my Ummah. It will split into 73 groups. Except for one of these groups, all the remaining will be thrown into Hell.

– Tirmidhi, Imam Ahmad, Abu Dawud, Mishkat

AbuHurayrah said:
The Prophet (SAW) said: The Jews were split up into seventy-one or seventy-two sects; and the Christians were split up into seventy one or seventy-two sects; and my community will be split up into seventy-three sects.

–  Sunan Abi Dawud 4596

Before we can verify how many Jewish sects there are we must first determine what a Jewish sect is within in the context of these ahadith. 

1. The sect cannot follow Jesus, for that would make it Christian
2. The sect cannot follow Muhammad (SAW), for that would make it Muslim
3. The sect must revolve around the Torah
4. The sect must have been founded by Banu Yisrael
5. The sect must worship the G-d of Ibrahim (AS), Ishaq (AS) and Yakub (AS) alone.

Now that we have established what a Jewish sect is we must determine when they came into existence. The tense Muhammad (SAW) uses suggests that he was referring to a historical event, “there was a disagreement and the Jews split”, so to identify these 71 or 72 sects we must first turn to the past.

First Century Sects

The Torah records the first Jewish sect as being the cult of the golden calf, the second sect we know of was the short lived sect of Korach, Datan and Aviram.  Later on, following the rule of Solomon, Yerav’am (Jeroboam) ben Nevat, established a sect in the Northern Kingdom of Israel. Although these examples are proof of sectarianism from Judaism’s earliest moments, the most fertile period for pre-diaspora Jewish sects was during the time of the Second Beit HaMikdash (Temple). Should there be ancient evidence for these ahadith, it is likely we’ll find it in this era. 

Sect Description Status
Pharisees / Perushim The Pharisees are the spiritual fathers of modern Judaism, emphasizing a strict interpretation and observance of the Mosaic law in both its oral and written form. Active
Sadducees / Tzedukim The Sadducees were a priestly, aristocratic sect that accepted Torah but rejected the oral law. Extinct
Essenes The Essenes lived in highly organized societies dedicated to asceticism, voluntary poverty, daily immersion, and abstinence from worldly pleasures, including (for some groups) celibacy.  Extinct
Zealots / Kanna’im / Biryonim They were a nationalist sect known for zealously defending Jewish law and national life, though they themselves were without religious leadership. Extinct
Sicarii A Kanna’im splinter group that hid daggers beneath their cloaks, which they used to stab anyone found committing a sacrilegious act or provoking anti-Jewish feeling (their name means “dagger”). Recorded by in the Talmud and by Josephus. Extinct
Therapeutae A Hellenistic Jewish sect with a reputation for philosophy, they lived chastely and in utter simplicity. Recorded by Philo. Extinct
Qumran Sect Were most likely an Essene sect that adopted a strict and separatist way of life. Most of what we know about them comes from their library preserved at Qumran (the Dead Sea Scrolls). Extinct
Galileans A small sect that believed Theudas to be a prophet of G-d. Recorded by Josephus and Justin Martyr Extinct
Herodians / Boethusians A Sadducean splinter sect recorded in the Talmud. Extinct
Hemerobaptists / Tovelei Shacharit They were an Essene sect that bathed each day before prayer in order to pronounce the name of G-d with a clean body. Recorded in the Talmud, Epiphanius and Hegesippus. Extinct
Followers of the Egyptian prophet Josephus mentions an Egyptian prophet proclaimed himself the Jewish messiah and led an army of 30,000 Jews to Jerusalem where they were quickly defeated. Extinct
Gnostics The gnostics were a first century Jewish sects that fused Gnosticism with Judaism. Extinct
Meristae An unidentified first century sect possibly Jewish recorded by Justin Martyr Extinct
Genistae An unidentified first century sect possibly Jewish recorded by Justin Martyr Extinct
Samaritans Although they rejected the Oral Law and the Written Law, in favor of their own slightly modified Torah, we have included the Samaritans as a Jewish sect because of their Jewish origin and closeness to Judaism Active

Chroniclers of this era talk of many more sects than those mentioned above, but if there were 71 or 72 sects during this period their names, beliefs and adherents have been lost to the passage of time. As only two sects from this era survived, instead of the 71 or 72 quoted in the ahadith Muhammad (SAW) could not have been talking about this period.

Sects at the time of Muhammad

The Prophet (SAW) spoke as if the split that had already happened, so the 71 or 72 sects should have been in existence during his lifetime. But when we examine 7th century Jewish theology we don’t see any such division, in fact we find the opposite. During this era the Talmudic schools of Babylon were able to unify the Jewish people into one homogeneous group. 

Sect Description Status
Pharisees / Jews Four centuries before the birth of Muhammad (SAW), rabbi Yehuda HaNasi realized the Oral Law was at risk of being forgotten and together with the greatest scholars of his time wrote it down in the Mishnah. The Mishnah was written in Israel, which during this period was the center of the Jewish world, but gradually rabbinic authority shifted from Israel to Babylon. 

For three centuries Babylonian rabbis elucidated the Mishnah in a collection of writings known as the Babylonian Gemara, together these teachings are known as the Babylonian Talmud.

About a century before the Babylonian Talmud was completed the rabbis of Israel finished the Jerusalem Talmud, which had similar teachings to its Babylonian counterpart but with greater focus on the laws relating to the land of Israel.

According to Maimonides during the time of the Geonim all Jewish communities formally accepted the Babylonian Talmud as binding upon themselves. However, there were isolated communities that Geonim weren’t in contact who with were unaware of this ruling. This explains why a small number of Jews to this day exclusively study the Jerusalem Talmud (e.g. the Romaniotes).

We must stress how similar in theology these two schools are, and for this reason we have not included them as separate sects. The rabbis of the Jerusalem Talmud are quoted throughout the Babylonian Talmud, and excluding one or two tiny communities – the Jerusalem and Babylonian Talmuds are universally learnt by all Jews today. Although the Babylonian Talmud takes precedence wherever the two conflict.

Active
Samaritans The Samaritans were still a large sect at the time of Muhammad (SAW) Active

It is highly unlikely that the Prophet was speaking about a division that occurred during his lifetime as this period was arguably the most unified the Jewish people had been since the 12 tribes wandered through the desert. The first known sect to emerge in the diaspora formed approximately 100 years after the death of  the Prophet (SAW), it is implausible that he was referring to any schism he witnessed.

Today’s divisions

Up until the haskala (the Jewish enlightenment) every Jew agreed to the divinity of the Written and Oral Law (with the exception of fringe groups like the Karaites and Samaritans). This meant that rather than dividing along theological lines, the Jewish communities differentiated themselves through the minhagim (customs) and nusachim (liturgy) that evolved in particular geographical areas. 

Although distinct from each other these groups are not sects, they share the same creed and any distinctions are slight and nuanced.

Sephardim
For 1500 years the Jewish communities of Sefard (the Iberian Peninsula) thrived until they were expelled from Christendom in 1492. Upon becoming homeless they sought refuge in friendlier nations, often with existing Jewish communities. These immigrant Jews brought with them a rich religious culture that was quickly adopted by the Pre-existing Jewish communities who were often far less scholarly. Today there is barely a community in the East that doesn’t follow the Shulchan Aruch or Mishneh Torah (two codifications of Jewish law written by Sephardi rabbis).

Ashkenazim
During the 11th century the Jews of France/Germany (Ashkenaz) began codifying customs and liturgy that slightly differed from their sephardi brethren, within a few centuries this community had swelled and developed into a rich civilization with it’s own language (Yiddish) and distinct religious characteristics. By the 17th century Poland-Lithuania had become the centers of this new world, where yeshivas and hasidic dynasties flourished. Today it is the biggest branch of Judaism with large settlements all over the world.

Mizrachim
Mizrach is Hebrew for east and is a collective term to describe the Jews that lived in the Middle East and Caucasus. While there are many Mizrachi groups, some with unique traditions that date back to the First Temple, most Mizrachim now follow a liturgy that combines their original traditions with the mainstream Sephardi customs.

Group Branch Sub-Group
Ashkenazim Because of their young age Ashkenazim are ethnically homogeneous
Beta Israel
Berber Jews
Georgian Jews
Italian Rite
Juhuro
Mizrahim Afghan Jews
Baghdadi Jews
Bene Israel
Cochin Jews
Bukhari Jews
Persian Jews
Syrian Jews
Romaniotes
Sephardim Maghrebi / Haketia Branch Algerian
Moroccan
Libyan
Tunisian
Judezmo Branch Greek
Turkish
Spanish & Portugese
Urfalim
Yemenite Baladi
Shami
Dor Daim

We have not included the Abayudaya, Bantu, Bnei Menashe, Black Hebrews, Igbo, Lemba and Yoruba as their claims have not been properly authenticated. Similarly we have excluded groups that lack notable religious distinctions.

Today’s sects

The last three centuries have seen an explosion in Jewish sectarianism, possibly greater than the time of the Second Temple. We have tried to list many of the divisions, but the line between sect and community is often blurred. 

We must also encourage caution when counting the Hasidic groups, most of these dynasties share near identical theologies and have only been included because of the distinct role each rebbe plays.

Movement Branch Sub-group
Orthodox / Pharisees Haredi Hasidic Achuza
Aleksander
Alesk
Amshinov
Apt/Zinkov/Mezhbizh
Ashlag
Bania
Beitsh
Belz
Berditchev
Bergsass
Biala
Bikovsk
Bitschkov
Bobov
Bohush
Borsha
Boston
Boyan
Bradshin
Breslov
Brezan
Brizdovitz
Burshtin
Chabad Lubavitch
Chernobyl
Chortkov
Chust
Chust-Tosh
Cleveland
Debrecen
Dinov
Dombrov
Dorog
Dushinsky
Dzhikov
Dzhikov-Melitzer
Erlau
Ger
Grusvardein
Hermanshtat
Hornsteipl
Husiatyn
Kalish
Kaliv
Karlin
Kasho
Kechneya
Kerestir
Khodorov
Koidanov
Kolbasov
Komarno
Kopyczynitz
Kosov
Kozhnitz
Kretshnif
Krula
Kuzmir
Lapash
Lelov
Lentshner
Lishensk
Liske
Lutsk
Machnovka
Magrov
Malachim
Melitz
Melitz-Turner
Mezhbizh
Mishkoltz
Modzitz
Mosholu
Munkacz
Muzhai
Nadvorna
Narol
Nikolsburg
Nirdhas
Novominsk
Ostrover
Ozharov
Pest
Pilzno
Pinsk-Karlin
Pittsburg
Polyina
Premishlan
Prochnik
Prshiskhe
Pshevosk
Puppa
Rachmastrivka
Rachov
Radomsk
Radovitz
Radzin
Ratzferter
Reisha
Rimenov
Roman
Ropshitz
Ruzhin
Sadigura
Sans-Tshakov
Sanz
Sanz-Gorlitz
Sanz-Gribov
Sanz-Klausenburg
Sanz-Leipnik
Sanz-Zhmigrod
Sasregen
Sassov
Satmar
Savran
Seilish
Shendishov
Shidlovtz
Shomer Emunim
Shotz
Shotz-Melitz
Siget
Sighet
Skolye
Skulen
Skver
Slonim
Slotvina-Sighet
Sochatchov
Spinka
Stanislov
Stitshin
Strizhov
Stropkov
Strozhnitz
Sulitz
Temeshvarer-Biksader
Toldos Aharon
Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok
Tosh
Trisk
Tsheshanov
Ulem
Ungvar
Vardein
Vasloi
Vien
Vizhnitz
Zablitov
Zalon-Lantzut
Ziditshiov-Drubitsh
Ziditshov
Zlotshov
Zolynia
Zolynia-Lantzut
Zutshka
Zvhil
Lithuanian Yeshivish
Perushim
Sephardi
Rambamists
Central Orthodox
Modern Orthodox Modern Orthodox
Open Orthodox
Carlebach
Religious Zionists Dati Leumi
Chardal
Maskilim Reform Reform / Liberal
Conservative / Masorti
Humanistic
Jewish Renewal.
Neolog
Reconstructionist
Humanistic
Karaites
Samaritans

Just like previous eras the ahadith seem unrelated to our current reality and any attempt to segment these 175 groups into 71 or 72 sects would be forced. In addition to not being able to reconcile the ahadith with Jewish sectarianism, the also mention divisions amongst the Chrstians and Muslims, yet the Protestant branch of Christianity has over 1,500 divisions alone and Islam also has far more than 73 divisions.

How are we to reconcile Jewish sectarianism with these ahadith? Both Judaism and Islam teach of yawm al-din (yom ha-din), the day when every man will be judged by Allah (SWT). At this time each man from every generation will be judged, members of extinct and active sects alike will be accountable on this day.

This means that while your initial question provoked a very interesting voyage through Jewish history. We do not need to seek evidence to support the ahadith in the modernity, we need only ask have there been 71 or 72 Jewish sects since the time of Musa (AS)? And this is entirely plausible

Allah (SWT) knows best.

Yosef
20
0

Who cares. You’re all killing each other under the influence yes I repeat influence of religion. You all need to forget irrelevant history of belief and use your own head. If that’s not ,99% intoxicated by Mohammed, Moses or Jesus and start living as one. Feed, dress, home, adopt,health to those in dire need, no matter what faitho or religion they are.
Wake up you ignorant blinded beings there is only one God(if any) humanity is more precious and important

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