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Contradictions between the Quran and the Torah

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How can we deal with the differing accounts of Biblical events that exist between the Quran and the Torah?

4 Answers

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quran got it all wrong.

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Can you show us some these contradictions… then we can address them for you.

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Qur’an 2:190:
“The sacred month and the sacred precincts are under the safeguard of reprisals: whoever offereth violence to you, offer ye the like violence to him, and fear God, and know that God is with those who fear Him.”
This is in direct contradiction with Leviticus 19:18, which says:
“Don’t take vengeance on or bear a grudge against any of your people; rather, love your neighbor as yourself; I am Adonai.”

Qur’an 2:6:
“Indeed, those who disbelieve – it is all the same for them whether you warn them or do not warn them – they will not believe,”
This is a direct contradiction with Ezekiel 3:18, which says:
“When I say unto the wicked, Thou shalt surely die; and thou givest him not warning, nor speakest to warn the wicked from his wicked way, to save his life; the same wicked man shall die in his iniquity; but his blood will I require at thine hand.”

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I believe the traditional Muslim answer would be to say that we (the Jews) changed the Torah and the Jewish answer would be to say that the Quran is incorrect when the Torah and Quran contradict each other. The less traditional answer from the more universalist wings of both religions (the “progressive” or liberal ends of the traditions) who tend to try to find truths in all religions would probably say that both are “divinely inspired” documents but not infallible and may go so far as to say that both were written by people. They would probably go one of two directions (these are more guesses since I’m not active with one of the “progressive” Jewish movements but I am rather on the more traditional side): chalk the differences up to human error and say that one or both are wrong, or they would say that the seemingly different passages may not be wrong but rather a signal of a greater meaning. Sometimes, during those times the Torah seem to contradict itself on the surface, when you dig into the commentaries and true meanings it really doesn’t (since a verse often has meanings well beyond the surface meaning on first read), and I believe that Islamic tradition may view the Quran similarly. If this is true within the same book, I’m sure that Torah and Quranic verses about the same topic that seem to say different things on the surface may have more in common when you dig into the commentaries and different deeper meanings found in both traditions.

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